Killing a Vampire

Posted April 21, 2017 by Greta in Artifacts, Phenomena, and Haunted Places, Encyclopedia and Lexicon, Guest Posts, Slavic Mythology / 0 Comments

There are about as many ways to kill a vampire as there are to make one!

So here are some common ways to take care of your unholy pest problem. Just don’t forget to double-tap!

You think I don’t watch your movies? You always come back. ~Buffy the Vampire Slayer

 

SUNLIGHT

Most vampires burn in sunlight. This is somewhat subjective however. An umbrella, large overcoat or specially tinted car windows may be enough to protect the undead from sunlight.

A spell used to harness the power of sunshine may be enough.

WOODEN STAKE

Most common method of killing a vampire is staking – though where and with what vary by regions

Ash wood preferred in Russia and other Baltic states, Oak in Silesia; hawthorn in Serbia

Thorn (blackthorn, hawthorn, or whitethorn) used often because of the belief thorns prevent evil. 

Staking the heart was thought to release the soul and pin down evil.

Staking through the mouth was common in Russia and Northern Germany

Staking through the stomach common in north-eastern Serbia

SILVER/Other Metals

Greek mythology: the goddess Artemis cursed the first vampire to burn when touched with silver. Most cases, silver is not fatal, but does slow the healing of a vampire and can help trap it.

Gypsies drove steel or iron needles into a corpse’s heart and placed bits of steel in the mouth, over the eyes, ears and between the fingers at the time of burial. They also placed hawthorn in the corpse’s sock or drove a hawthorn stake through the legs.

16th Century venice: A brick forced in the mouth of a female corpse was interpreted as a vampire slaying.

BEHEADING

After decapitation, the head should be buried between the feet, behind the buttocks are far from the body.

Head could also be staked to the ground after decapitation to prevent further rising from the grave.

Pretty straight-forward method – detach head from body.

Preferred method in German and Western Slavic areas.

FIRE

Apparently, according to many legends, vampires are highly flammable. Or inflammable.

Once a vampire has been burned, it is wise to scatter the ashes. You may also wish to pour holy water or salt on the site of the burning or the along with the ashes.

AND STAY DEAD!!

Most often, further precautions beyond actual initial slaying are required. In addition to those mentioned above, these can include, but are not limited pouring boiling water or holy water over the place of burial, scattering of ashes to avoid recombination of vampire particles, salting earth after destruction of undead corpse, exorcism by priests, burial with garlic, staking (or shooting!) the coffin in the ground, placing a lemon in the mouth of the corpse, or dismemberment followed by mixing with water and administering to deceased’s family members as cure.

 
Vampire Disposal methods by country of origin

 

 
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SPECIES
COUNTRY
APPROVED METHOD OF DISPOSAL
Sampiro
Albania
Stake through heart
Nachtzehrer
Bavaria
Place coin in mouth, decapitate with axe
Ogoljen
Bohemia
Bury at crossroads
Krvoijac
Bulgaria
Chain to grave with wild roses
Kathakano
Crete
Boil head in vinegar
Brukulaco
Greece
Cut off and burn head
Vampir
Hungary
Stake through heart, nail through temple
Dearg-dul
Ireland
Pile stones on grave
Vryolakas
Macedonia
Pour boiling oil on, drive nail through navel
Upier
Poland
Bury face downwards
Gierach
Prussia
Put poppy seeds in grave
Strigoiul
Rumania
Remove heart, cut in two; garlic in mouth, nail in head
Vlkoslak
Serbia
Cut off toes, drive nail through neck
Neuntoter
Saxony
Lemon in mouth
Vampiro
Spain
No known remedy
 
 

 

 
References:

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